Putting the "WORK" in Workshops
     

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ENRICH workshops are highly interactive sessions where everyone participates and contributes.  You'll learn key principles from seasoned ACH Faculty, ACH Faculty-in-Training (FITs), and ACH Relationship-centered Communication Facilitators (RCFs) then you'll get the chance to practice those skills via role play scenarios or small breakout groups.  The facilitators, and your fellow workshop participants, will provide feedback and coaching so you're left armed with techniques to implement in your everyday work! 

Attendees will get to participate in two of the following 2-hour workshop options- one on Friday and one on Saturday.  Note that workshops are standalone, meaning the content for each day is the same and is simply repeated.  

 

2019 Workshops include:

  • Improving Patient Experience with Relationship-centered Communication (RCC) Skills* (Strongly recommended for 1st time attendees or those who have not previously participated in ACH RCC offerings, such as the ACH 1-day course or ACH Train-the-Trainer program.  Only offered on Friday, but participants will have priority in selecting a 2nd workshop to attend on Saturday.)
  • Coaching and Feedback through Relationship, Reflection and Intentional Change
  • Communication Skills for Effective Conflict Engagement
  • "Can I Really Ask That?"  Culture, Diversity, and Hierarchy
  • Leading Interprofessional High Performance Healthcare Teams
Improving Patient Experience with Relationship-centered Communication (RCC) Skills

ACH Faculty Facilitators: 
Auguste H. Fortin VI, MD, MPH, MACP, FACH
Lynn O’Neill, MD

This workshop is strongly recommended for 1st time attendees or those who have not previously participated in ACH RCC offerings, such as the ACH 1-day course.  The RCC workshop is only offered on Friday, but participants will have priority in selecting a 2nd workshop to attend on Saturday.

The workshop teaches a critical set of communication competencies that healthcare professionals must demonstrate for the delivery of high-quality care. Even though communication is a learnable set of skills, relatively few clinicians have undergone effective training in communication, and even fewer receive ongoing feedback about their communication skills with patients and colleagues. This workshop introduces the fundamental skills of relationship-centered communication, useful in clinical and non-clinical communication, and engages participants in skills-practice:

  • Recognize the benefits of improving communication skills
  • Establish rapport
  • Elicit the patient’s concerns
  • Negotiate an agenda with the patient
  • Explore the patient’s perspective
  • Respond to a patient with empathy
  • Share information with the patient in small chunks
  • Assess a patient’s understanding
Coaching and Feedback through Relationship, Reflection and Intentional Change

ACH Faculty Facilitators:
Maysel Kemp White, PhD, MFT, FACH
Matt Russell, MD

This workshop builds upon the fundamental relationship-centered communication (RCC) skills learned in the RCC workshop or at an RCC course at your home institution to equip learners with the leadership skills needed to coach members of the healthcare team toward improved relationship building and communication skills.  We will introduce a model of coaching that is a parallel process to Relationship-Centered Communication. The model includes three core skills sets. (1) Building a relationship by discovering a learner’s strengths and vision of successful clinician-patient or colleague interactions, (2) Building a collaborative plan by exploring and discovering an individual’s specific learning needs to grow towards their greatest potential while leveraging strengths, and (3) Building skills by providing effective feedback and implementing coaching strategies for facilitating change toward the learner’s vision. 

Learning objectives:

  1. Practice building a coaching relationship by discovering learner’s strengths and the vision for successful relationship-centered interactions.
  2. Practice building a collaborative plan to achieve the learner’s vision.
  3. Experience building skills by receiving and providing feedback to facilitate deliberate practice and intentional change.

 

Communication Skills for Effective Conflict Engagement

ACH Faculty Facilitators:
Sally Fortner, MD
Keith Mansel, MD

This experiential workshop builds upon the fundamental relationship-centered communication (RCC) skills learned in the RCC workshop or at an RCC course at your home institution.  It will allow participants to practice relationship-centered frameworks for engaging constructively in conflict and for resolving conflict. Conflict is an inevitable occurrence in sustained human interactions. In healthcare, it may arise between patients (or their loved ones) and clinicians or administrators as well as between colleagues and co-workers and among teammates. Often, we think of conflict as a threat to relationships, and the way in which we engage in conflict provokes defensiveness or escalates the conflict unnecessarily. However, skillful management of conflict can avoid these pitfalls and lead to closer and more effective relationships. This workshop will provide skills practice for approaching conflict as an opportunity for honest conversations about differences.

By the end of the workshop track, participants will be able to:

  • Identify your preferred conflict styles and describe situations where the preferred styles are effective and situations where they are limiting
  • Describe key skills for effectively engaging in conflict in a relationship-centered way.
  • Distinguish interests from positions.
  • Demonstrate multiple strategies for resolving conflict.
"Can I Really Ask That?" Culture, Diversity, and Hierarchy

ACH Faculty Facilitators:
Denise Davis, MD, FACH
Kara Myers, CNM, MS, FACH

“I'm glad I understand that while language is a gift, listening is a responsibility.”
Nikki Giovanni

Health professions education has historically provided few opportunities for learning how to effectively address racial, ethnic, sexual orientation and gender differences in relationship centered ways.  This workshop builds upon the fundamental relationship-centered communication (RCC) skills learned in the RCC workshop or at an RCC course at your home institution.  It aims to help participants feel more comfortable in opening conversations about these differences in both personal and professional domains. This workshop is an introduction to a half day ACH workshop on communication for diversity, equity and inclusion in healthcare.

By the end of the workshop track, participants will be able to:

1. Develop personal goals for how to address diversity and foster inclusion in home institutions

2. Discuss and practice communication strategies that allow for power and privilege to be discussed in a way that is an invitation to learn more about self, patients, learners and colleagues

Leading Interprofessional High Performance Healthcare Teams

ACH Faculty Facilitators:
Tim Gilligan, MD
Denise Mohess, MD
Craig Roth, MD

A large proportion of healthcare is teamwork, and the strength and effectiveness of clinical and organizational teams is strongly linked to quality of care, medical outcomes, and the experience of clinicians and other healthcare workers. And yet, most people working in healthcare have had very little training in how to build and sustain highly functional teams.  

This workshop builds upon the fundamental relationship-centered communication (RCC) skills learned in the RCC workshop or at an RCC course at your home institution.  It will use interactive and experiential methods to explore specific leadership techniques to help you engage teammates and navigate the stages of team development with a focus on process, building relationships, and developing a shared vision and understanding of the team’s goals and identity.

By the end of the workshop track, participants will be able to:

  1. Develop a plan to integrate stages of team development to current team situations and match them with specific leadership behaviors to facilitate smooth navigation and transitions to improve employee engagement.
  2. Lead exercises that help teammates get to know each other and develop a sense of connection.
  3. Lead exercises that help teammates understand each other’s roles on the team and appreciate how the different roles relate to each other.
  4. Run team meetings and activities in a manner that allows each teammate’s voice to be heard.